Four Sunny and Stunning California Interiors from Commune Designs

For people who care about preserving historic buildings and take their inspiration from designs of the past, it is always distressing when an old building is renovated and/or entirely destroyed in the process of trying to make something old into something new. For their part, the team at Commune Design has made it their mission to not just restore historic, design-forward spaces but to transform them into spaces with all the modern amenities that still retain the spirit of the past, in addition to their commercial work on stores and hotels. In this post, we’ll look at four different, equally stunning examples of their California dreams come to life by way of incredible design.


The first space is a private residence on Amanda Drive in Studio City, California originally designed by Rudolf Schindler in 1948. This renovation took a tremendous amount of work, starting with the research into what the original design intended. Only after the team was able to strip away drywall, paint, tile, and other materials that had been slapped on top of the original look could they really get to work on their stunning restoration. With a beautiful frame for the space in the house itself, Commune was able to fill it with custom furnishings and interesting elements that give it a unique, timeless feel.

groovy-living-room

oversize-windows

wood-panel-ceilings

70s-era-bedroom

reclaimed-wood-dining-set

wood-floor-paneling

The next design is another California residence, this one in the Nichols Canyon area of Hollywood. The building was first built in 1961 by Buff & Hensmen. Commune restored the space to its original floorplan, including expansive windows that all slide or stack for maximum airflow. The unique exterior of the home was another stylistic addition and is made from reclaimed barn wood. In true Hollywood fashion, the home is remote controlled and energy efficient.
The next design is another California residence, this one in the Nichols Canyon area of Hollywood. The building was first built in 1961 by Buff & Hensmen. Commune restored the space to its original floorplan, including expansive windows that all slide or stack for maximum airflow. The unique exterior of the home was another stylistic addition and is made from reclaimed barn wood. In true Hollywood fashion, the home is remote controlled and energy efficient.

cool-retro-pool

sleek-pool-deck

wood-home-exterior-creative

aweome-mid-century-chair

patchwork-area-rug

entryway-armoire

simple-gray-sofa

wood-panel-reclaimed

bedroom-sitting-area

painted-picnic-table

outdoor-private-bar

pool-house

open-dining-area

tiled-bathroom-windows

round-basin-tub

The third example from this talented team comes in the form of jewelry designer Irene Neuwirth's West Hollywood shop that could easily be mistaken for a jewelry-lover's home. From it's stunning brick facade to the plush pink sofas and quirky displays for the designer's wares, this is a luxury shopping experience from top to tail.
The third example from this talented team comes in the form of jewelry designer Irene Neuwirth’s West Hollywood shop that could easily be mistaken for a jewelry-lover’s home. From it’s stunning brick facade to the plush pink sofas and quirky displays for the designer’s wares, this is a luxury shopping experience from top to tail.

soft-pink-sofa

retro-kitschy-design

round-dining-table

funky-kitschy-art

bright-southwest-interior

spanish-style-dining-room

private-jewelry-display

spanish-style-kitchen

The final space we're featuring is another Los Angeles residence renovation. The home was originally built in 1931 by a Japanese engineer. The team at Commune brought this home into a new century with the addition of reclaimed metal windows, clay finished walls and glazed concrete floor tiles. There is a distinct Spanish villa feel about this home, though the designers themselves call it a modern Japanese farmhouse. The outdoor entertaining spaces are the icing on this gorgeous cake.
The final space we’re featuring is another Los Angeles residence renovation. The home was originally built in 1931 by a Japanese engineer. The team at Commune brought this home into a new century with the addition of reclaimed metal windows, clay finished walls and glazed concrete floor tiles. There is a distinct Spanish villa feel about this home, though the designers themselves call it a modern Japanese farmhouse. The outdoor entertaining spaces are the icing on this gorgeous cake.

leather-armchair

dark-wood-paneling

cool-indoor-fireplace-stove

awesome-dining-chairs

wire-molded-chairs-hairpin-legs

ceramic-tile-interior

retro-spanish-bedroom

modern-kids-room-design

mod-galss-light-fixture

wood-bathroom-fixtures

simple-private-villa-bath

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